310-344-2276

HOW DO I KNOW IF
MY CHILD NEEDS OT?

If your child exhibits one or more of the following ‘red flags,' it is highly recommended that your child receive a comprehensive occupational therapy evaluation by a licensed occupational therapist, preferably one that is Sensory Integration certified.

HOW DO I
KNOW IF
MY CHILD
NEEDS OT?

If your child exhibits one or more of the following ‘red flags,' it is highly recommended that your child receive a comprehensive occupational therapy evaluation by a licensed occupational therapist, preferably one that is Sensory Integration certified.

What Is Sensory Integration Therapy?

Sensory Integration therapy is a specific and individualized treatment program for children with sensory processing disorders. Everyday, we gain sensory experiences through touch, movement, body awareness, sight, sound, and the pull of gravity. Sensory integration is the brain’s ability to organize and interpret sensory information we receive to use it in a meaningful way. This provides the foundation for later, more complex, learning and behavior.


A Closer Look at Sensory Processing Disorder

Challenges Related to Sensory Modulation Disorder (SMD):

  • Is in constant motion and/ or craves movement
  • Activity level that is unusually high or low
  • Has difficulty maintaining attention, staying focused, and is easily distracted
  • Avoids getting messy or smears messy textures all over self
  • Overstuffs mouth or is a messy eater
  • Is a risk taker and lacks safety awareness
  • Is fearful of movement, heights, climbing, swinging, or roughhousing, etc.
  • Is over or under responsive to touch, movement, sights, sounds, and/or smells
  • Purposefully bumps into others / objects or falls onto the floor
  • Delays in speech, language, and overall motor skills
  • Has decreased play skills compared to their peers
  • Is easily overwhelmed or frustrated
  • Is impulsive in their actions (lacking self control) and has difficulty organizing themselves and / or their space
  • Has difficulty calming down when they are upset
  • Has difficulty waiting in line or is aggressive with peers
  • Enjoys wrestling, but has difficulty knowing when to stop
  • Has difficulty knowing how much force to use on objects, i.e. throws a ball too hard
  • Delays in academic achievement and often appears learning disables.
  • Has difficulty sitting during circle time, class, or at the table / desk
  • Is in constant motion and/ or craves movement
  • Activity level that is unusually high or low
  • Has difficulty maintaining attention, staying focused, and is easily distracted
  • Avoids getting messy or smears messy textures all over self
  • Overstuffs mouth or is a messy eater
  • Is a risk taker and lacks safety awareness
  • Is fearful of movement, heights, climbing, swinging, or roughhousing, etc.
  • Is over or under responsive to touch, movement, sights, sounds, and/or smells
  • Purposefully bumps into others / objects or falls onto the floor
  • Delays in speech, language, and overall motor skills
  • Has decreased play skills compared to their peers
  • Is easily overwhelmed or frustrated
  • Is impulsive in their actions (lacking self control) and has difficulty organizing themselves and / or their space
  • Has difficulty calming down when they are upset
  • Has difficulty waiting in line or is aggressive with peers
  • Enjoys wrestling, but has difficulty knowing when to stop
  • Has difficulty knowing how much force to use on objects, i.e. throws a ball too hard
  • Delays in academic achievement and often appears learning disables.
  • Has difficulty sitting during circle time, class, or at the table / desk

Challenges Related to Sensory Discrimination Disorder (SDD):

  • Difficulties discriminating hot and cold
  • Difficulties “feeling” items without use of vision (i.e. finding keys in a bag while having a conversation with another persion)
  • Know’s they are falling but is unsure of direction and has difficulty protecting self
  • Difficulty judging distance between self and others
  • Decreased sensation of the urge to use the restroom
  • Talks too loudly or too softly
  • Difficulties judging how much force to place onto objects (roughhousing to the point of someone getting hurt, throwing a ball too hard or too soft, petting an animal with too much force)
  • Poor awareness of movement of body; gets easily disoriented
  • Decreased sensation of being too hungry or too full
  • Decreased sensation of an upset stomach
  • Difficulties discriminating hot and cold
  • Difficulties “feeling” items without use of vision (i.e. finding keys in a bag while having a conversation with another persion)
  • Know’s they are falling but is unsure of direction and has difficulty protecting self
  • Difficulty judging distance between self and others
  • Decreased sensation of the urge to use the restroom
  • Talks too loudly or too softly
  • Difficulties judging how much force to place onto objects (roughhousing to the point of someone getting hurt, throwing a ball too hard or too soft, petting an animal with too much force)
  • Poor awareness of movement of body; gets easily disoriented
  • Decreased sensation of being too hungry or too full
  • Decreased sensation of an upset stomach

Challenges Related to Sensory Based Motor Disorder (SMBD):

  • Seems weaker than their peers, i.e. fatigues easily
  • Is clumsy, i.e. falls frequently or has decreased balance
  • Avoids playground equipment and prefers playing in the sandbox or with a group of children on the side
  • Slouches in their chair
  • Met developmental milestones late
  • Has / had difficulty learning how to ride a bike, skip, or jump rope
  • Has difficulty or avoids playing team sports that require good coordination
  • Seems weaker than their peers, i.e. fatigues easily
  • Is clumsy, i.e. falls frequently or has decreased balance
  • Avoids playground equipment and prefers playing in the sandbox or with a group of children on the side
  • Slouches in their chair
  • Met developmental milestones late
  • Has / had difficulty learning how to ride a bike, skip, or jump rope
  • Has difficulty or avoids playing team sports that require good coordination

Additional Signs & Sympotoms

YOUR CHILD MAY POSSIBLY HAVE


Challenges Related to Fine, Visual Motor, and/or Perceptual Skills:

  • Avoids or does not like writing, drawing, arts and crafts
  • Presents with messy drawing and handwriting
  • Holds their pencil incorrectly
  • Complains of hands hurting
  • Has difficulty with cutting or coloring within given lines
  • Has difficulty learning the alphabet and letters
  • Has difficulty putting together puzzles
  • Has difficulty drawing shapes
  • Has difficulty using utensils
  • Has difficulty with buttons, snaps, zippers, tying shoes
  • Avoids or does not like writing, drawing, arts and crafts
  • Presents with messy drawing and handwriting
  • Holds their pencil incorrectly
  • Complains of hands hurting
  • Has difficulty with cutting or coloring within given lines
  • Has difficulty learning the alphabet and letters
  • Has difficulty putting together puzzles
  • Has difficulty drawing shapes
  • Has difficulty using utensils
  • Has difficulty with buttons, snaps, zippers, tying shoes

What does Fine Motor mean?

“Fine motor” refers to the movements we make with the small muscles of the hands. Children start to use their hands right at birth to explore their own bodies and the world around them. Their fine motor skills develop as their whole body starts to move and become more stable. They also learn to do more things with their hands as their cognitive and social/emotional skills improve.

How we evaluate your child?

“OT 4 Kid’s occupational therapists are trained to assess your childs fine motor skills compared to where they should be based on their peers. A child’s handwriting assessment is comprehensive; it includes identifying his current level of functioning in the areas of visual skills, ocular motor skills, body awareness, fine motor planning, shoulder stability, and hand and finger strength. To do this, our therapists will discuss the child’s performance with the parents and teachers, perform standardized assessments, obtain a handwriting sample and observe the child’s fine and gross motor movement patterns. This handwriting assessment allows the therapist to identify the child’s strengths and weaknesses in these skills areas and reveal the source of his difficulty with handwriting.

Following the handwriting assessment, the therapist will develop goals based on the child’s performance and design a treatment program that concentrates on improving these foundational skills. Treatment for handwriting difficulty may include the Handwriting Without Tears ® program, sensorimotor strategies, strengthening the intrinsic muscles of the hand, compensatory strategies such as pencil grips or writing paper with visual cues, and ergonomic strategies such as a slant board or the child’s positioning at the desk.

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What does Fine Motor mean?

“Fine motor” refers to the movements we make with the small muscles of the hands. Children start to use their hands right at birth to explore their own bodies and the world around them. Their fine motor skills develop as their whole body starts to move and become more stable. They also learn to do more things with their hands as their cognitive and social/emotional skills improve.

How we evaluate your child?

“OT 4 Kid’s occupational therapists are trained to assess your childs fine motor skills compared to where they should be based on their peers. A child’s handwriting assessment is comprehensive; it includes identifying his current level of functioning in the areas of visual skills, ocular motor skills, body awareness, fine motor planning, shoulder stability, and hand and finger strength. To do this, our therapists will discuss the child’s performance with the parents and teachers, perform standardized assessments, obtain a handwriting sample and observe the child’s fine and gross motor movement patterns. This handwriting assessment allows the therapist to identify the child’s strengths and weaknesses in these skills areas and reveal the source of his difficulty with handwriting.

Following the handwriting assessment, the therapist will develop goals based on the child’s performance and design a treatment program that concentrates on improving these foundational skills. Treatment for handwriting difficulty may include the Handwriting Without Tears ® program, sensorimotor strategies, strengthening the intrinsic muscles of the hand, compensatory strategies such as pencil grips or writing paper with visual cues, and ergonomic strategies such as a slant board or the child’s positioning at the desk.

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Challenges Relating to Gross Motor Skills:

  • Difficulty planning, organizing, and sequencing a task
  • Appear accident prone, and clumsy
  • Has a difficult time mastering a new skill and/or difficulty sequencing steps need to complete a task
  • Delayed gross motor milestones for her age
  • Seems weaker & fatigues quicker than same age peers
  • Has difficulties with balance & motor coordination compared to same age peers
  • Difficulty planning, organizing, and sequencing a task
  • Appear accident prone, and clumsy
  • Has a difficult time mastering a new skill and/or difficulty sequencing steps need to complete a task
  • Delayed gross motor milestones for her age
  • Seems weaker & fatigues quicker than same age peers
  • Has difficulties with balance & motor coordination compared to same age peers

What Does Gross Motor Mean?

Gross Motor Skills are skills that develop through using the large muscles of the body in a coordinated and controlled way. We receive sensory information from our bodies and the environment through our sensory systems (vision, hearing, smell, taste, touch, vestibular, and proprioception). This sensory information then needs to be organized and processed to be able to produce an appropriate motor or movement response for success in daily tasks at home or at school. Gross motor skills develop through practice and repetition, which is why a baby takes weeks to perfect the art of rolling, sitting or crawling.

How We Treat Your Child?

Occupational therapists can help the child engage in individualized and organized sensory experiences (jumping, climbing, pushing, and pulling) to address skills such as bilateral integration and coordination, midline crossing, and postural control to strengthen his/her ability to participate in sensorimotor activities.

There are multiple programs and treatments to help boost Gross Motor functions. At OT 4 Kids, one program utilized focuses on a series of approximately 300 exercises that combines the use of racquetballs, sand-filled beanbags and a balance board. This kind of treatment requires the student to integrate the vestibular, auditory, and visual systems, in conjunction with their proprioceptive system all simultaneously, thus improving focused and joint attention, balance, crossing midline, visual scanning, bilateral integration, timing and sequencing, sequential memory, modulation of force, strength, endurance, gross, fine and visual motor coordination, impulse control, communication and social skills.

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What Does Gross Motor Mean?

Gross Motor Skills are skills that develop through using the large muscles of the body in a coordinated and controlled way. We receive sensory information from our bodies and the environment through our sensory systems (vision, hearing, smell, taste, touch, vestibular, and proprioception). This sensory information then needs to be organized and processed to be able to produce an appropriate motor or movement response for success in daily tasks at home or at school. Gross motor skills develop through practice and repetition, which is why a baby takes weeks to perfect the art of rolling, sitting or crawling.

How We Treat Your Child?

Occupational therapists can help the child engage in individualized and organized sensory experiences (jumping, climbing, pushing, and pulling) to address skills such as bilateral integration and coordination, midline crossing, and postural control to strengthen his/her ability to participate in sensorimotor activities.

There are multiple programs and treatments to help boost Gross Motor functions. At OT 4 Kids, one program utilized focuses on a series of approximately 300 exercises that combines the use of racquetballs, sand-filled beanbags and a balance board. This kind of treatment requires the student to integrate the vestibular, auditory, and visual systems, in conjunction with their proprioceptive system all simultaneously, thus improving focused and joint attention, balance, crossing midline, visual scanning, bilateral integration, timing and sequencing, sequential memory, modulation of force, strength, endurance, gross, fine and visual motor coordination, impulse control, communication and social skills.

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Challenges Relating to Activities of Daily Living and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living:

  • Has difficulty dressing/ undressing
  • Has difficulty with buttons, snaps, tying shoes, etc
  • Has decreased awareness of clothing on their body, i.e. leaves shirt half out, pants tucked in socks, etc.
  • Has difficulty sequencing steps to make a simple sandwich or to make a bed
  • Has difficulty organizing time to get ready in a timely manner
  • Has difficulty learning how to hang and fold clothes
  • Fatigues easily while blow-drying or doing hair
  • Has poor grooming and hygiene skills or awareness
  • Does not tolerate all grooming and hygiene tasks, i.e. brushing teeth, hair, etc.
  • Has difficulty organizing their work space (desk) or maintaining organization of their room
  • Has difficulty opening and closing containers, zip-lock bags, etc.
  • Has difficulty dressing/ undressing
  • Has difficulty with buttons, snaps, tying shoes, etc
  • Has decreased awareness of clothing on their body, i.e. leaves shirt half out, pants tucked in socks, etc.
  • Has difficulty sequencing steps to make a simple sandwich or to make a bed
  • Has difficulty organizing time to get ready in a timely manner
  • Has difficulty learning how to hang and fold clothes
  • Fatigues easily while blow-drying or doing hair
  • Has poor grooming and hygiene skills or awareness
  • Does not tolerate all grooming and hygiene tasks, i.e. brushing teeth, hair, etc.
  • Has difficulty organizing their work space (desk) or maintaining organization of their room
  • Has difficulty opening and closing containers, zip-lock bags, etc.

What Do We Mean By Activities of Daily Living?

Activities of Daily Living (ADL’s) – These include basic self-care activities such as feeding, grooming, toileting, dressing, and general hygiene. Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL’s) – These include more complex skills that are needed to be successful to live independently. Examples include: chores around the house, preparing meals, using the phone, using public transportation, homework completion skills, etc.

Occupational therapists are trained to assist children in developing the necessary skills to complete activities that support their daily functioning and participation. Depending on a child’s particular diagnosis or functional deficits, a variety of interventions might be used to support their performance and participation in daily activities. Typically, teaching these skills will require more than just stating the steps of what needs to be done; repeated modeling, use of visuals to promote memory and sequencing, and other compensatory methods (e.g. adaptive equipment, modifying the task) may all be utilized to ensure children can perform daily tasks to the best of their abilities.

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What Do We Mean By Activities of Daily Living?

Activities of Daily Living (ADL’s) – These include basic self-care activities such as feeding, grooming, toileting, dressing, and general hygiene. Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL’s) – These include more complex skills that are needed to be successful to live independently. Examples include: chores around the house, preparing meals, using the phone, using public transportation, homework completion skills, etc.

Occupational therapists are trained to assist children in developing the necessary skills to complete activities that support their daily functioning and participation. Depending on a child’s particular diagnosis or functional deficits, a variety of interventions might be used to support their performance and participation in daily activities. Typically, teaching these skills will require more than just stating the steps of what needs to be done; repeated modeling, use of visuals to promote memory and sequencing, and other compensatory methods (e.g. adaptive equipment, modifying the task) may all be utilized to ensure children can perform daily tasks to the best of their abilities.

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Challenges Related to Ocular Motor Control:

  • Avoids reading and writing
  • Complains of their eyes hurting or being tired during reading / homework
  • Skips words / lines or misreads words while reading
  • Is a slow reader
  • Is slow at copying from the board or a book
  • May have difficulty playing sports
  • Has difficulty finding where they left off in a book if they look up
  • Presents with decreased attention to task (i.e. homework)
  • May have challenges with writing neatly
  • Has difficulty catching a ball coming towards them
  • Avoids reading and writing
  • Complains of their eyes hurting or being tired during reading / homework
  • Skips words / lines or misreads words while reading
  • Is a slow reader
  • Is slow at copying from the board or a book
  • May have difficulty playing sports
  • Has difficulty finding where they left off in a book if they look up
  • Presents with decreased attention to task (i.e. homework)
  • May have challenges with writing neatly
  • Has difficulty catching a ball coming towards them

What Does Ocular Motor Mean?

Ocular motor (oculomotor) control and visual perception are foundational skills necessary for a variety of daily activities, including, but not limited to reading, writing, catching, throwing, organization, and safety when navigating environments. Occupational therapists are trained to identify and treat difficulties related to visual perception and ocular motor control in order to facilitate participation and engagement in meaningful activities.

Ocular motor muscles, much like the small muscles in our hands and fingers, work together to control eye movements and facilitate eye teaming (the ability of our eyes to work together in a coordinated fashion). Our eyes must work together to complete smooth tracking movements (such as tracking words across a page as you read) and convergence/divergence movements (such as used when looking up and back down to copy information from the board). Impairments in ocular motor control (often stemming from muscle weakness, vestibular processing challenges, or injury or dysfunction within the central nervous system) can directly influence a child’s ability to accurately perceive and receive visual information.

Visual perception describes the ability to perceive and interpret visual information. Visual perception includes many components, including visual discrimination, visual-spatial awareness, figure-ground perception, form constancy, and visual memory, to name a few. Challenges in this area are often associated with learning difficulties in reading, writing, math, and spelling. Other daily activities, such as grooming and dressing, play activities, and athletic performance, are also frequently affected. Visual perception and ocular motor skills are evaluated through standardized assessments and various clinical observations. Following evaluation, a specific treatment plan is created to address a child’s unique needs. Ocular motor control and visual perception skills can be addressed through a variety of therapeutic interventions.

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What Does Ocular Motor Mean?

Ocular motor (oculomotor) control and visual perception are foundational skills necessary for a variety of daily activities, including, but not limited to reading, writing, catching, throwing, organization, and safety when navigating environments. Occupational therapists are trained to identify and treat difficulties related to visual perception and ocular motor control in order to facilitate participation and engagement in meaningful activities.

Ocular motor muscles, much like the small muscles in our hands and fingers, work together to control eye movements and facilitate eye teaming (the ability of our eyes to work together in a coordinated fashion). Our eyes must work together to complete smooth tracking movements (such as tracking words across a page as you read) and convergence/divergence movements (such as used when looking up and back down to copy information from the board). Impairments in ocular motor control (often stemming from muscle weakness, vestibular processing challenges, or injury or dysfunction within the central nervous system) can directly influence a child’s ability to accurately perceive and receive visual information.

Visual perception describes the ability to perceive and interpret visual information. Visual perception includes many components, including visual discrimination, visual-spatial awareness, figure-ground perception, form constancy, and visual memory, to name a few. Challenges in this area are often associated with learning difficulties in reading, writing, math, and spelling. Other daily activities, such as grooming and dressing, play activities, and athletic performance, are also frequently affected. Visual perception and ocular motor skills are evaluated through standardized assessments and various clinical observations. Following evaluation, a specific treatment plan is created to address a child’s unique needs. Ocular motor control and visual perception skills can be addressed through a variety of therapeutic interventions.

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Challenges Related to Social Skills:

  • Has difficulty making and keeping friends
  • Has difficulty knowing what to say and when
  • Has difficulty playing games, losing or working as a team
  • Has poor eye contact and ability to stay attentive during games / conversations, etc.
  • Has difficulty reading social cues
  • Becomes overly silly or shuts down when with peers
  • Has difficulty sharing, taking turns, or waiting in line
  • Has difficulty initiating and maintaining conversations with peers
  • Has difficulty making and keeping friends
  • Has difficulty knowing what to say and when
  • Has difficulty playing games, losing or working as a team
  • Has poor eye contact and ability to stay attentive during games / conversations, etc.
  • Has difficulty reading social cues
  • Becomes overly silly or shuts down when with peers
  • Has difficulty sharing, taking turns, or waiting in line
  • Has difficulty initiating and maintaining conversations with peers

What Do We Mean By Social Skills?

When we refers to "Social Skills" we are talking about the ability for your child to interact with other people and to understand and control their own emotions. Babies start to develop relationships with the people around them right from birth, but the process of learning to communicate, share, and interact with others take many years to develop. Developing the ability to control your emotions and behavior is also a long process. Children continue to develop their social-eotional skills well into their teenage years, or even young adulthood.

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What Our Training Entails?

Our social skills training and curriculums are designed from evidenced based practice methods and procedures. Social skills principles are taught based on the individuals and groups needs, and incorporate sensory based and kinesthetic based learning principles for improved skill acquisition. Curriculums typically last anywhere from 6-12 weeks in length and are supported by caregiver education, off-site fieldtrips to help generalize skills learned in the classroom, and ongoing assessment of each child's abilities. Past curriculums have included: Social Thinking (Zones of Regulation, SuperFlex, The Incredible Flexible You, Whole Body Listening Larry, Social Detective), the PEERS Program, ICPS-I Can Problem Solve, Skillstreaming in Early Childhood, Elementary, and Adolescent, Stop & Think, The Accepts Program, and The Prepare Program.

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What Do We Mean By Social Skills?

When we refers to "Social Skills" we are talking about the ability for your child to interact with other people and to understand and control their own emotions. Babies start to develop relationships with the people around them right from birth, but the process of learning to communicate, share, and interact with others take many years to develop. Developing the ability to control your emotions and behavior is also a long process. Children continue to develop their social-eotional skills well into their teenage years, or even young adulthood.

What Our Training Entails?

Our social skills training and curriculums are designed from evidenced based practice methods and procedures. Social skills principles are taught based on the individuals and groups needs, and incorporate sensory based and kinesthetic based learning principles for improved skill acquisition. Curriculums typically last anywhere from 6-12 weeks in length and are supported by caregiver education, off-site fieldtrips to help generalize skills learned in the classroom, and ongoing assessment of each child's abilities. Past curriculums have included: Social Thinking (Zones of Regulation, SuperFlex, The Incredible Flexible You, Whole Body Listening Larry, Social Detective), the PEERS Program, ICPS-I Can Problem Solve, Skillstreaming in Early Childhood, Elementary, and Adolescent, Stop & Think, The Accepts Program, and The Prepare Program.

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Challenges Relating to Executive Functioning:

  • Has decreased attention to school and home work and avoids it
  • Has difficulty with multi-step directions and forgets what is told to them
  • Has poor organization skills
  • Difficulties keeping track of time
  • Difficulties making plans
  • Sticks with a plan, even when it’s clear that the plan isn’t working
  • Finds it hard to figure out how to get started on a task
  • Doesn’t always have the words to explain something in detail
  • Can focus on small details or the overall picture, but not both at the same time
  • Difficulties looking for help or for more information when needed
  • Difficulty applying previously learned information to solve problems
  • Loses a train of thought when interrupted
  • Needs to be told the directions many times
  • Has trouble making decisions
  • Difficulties multitasking
  • Does things either quickly and messily or slowly and incompletely
  • Needs help processing what something feels/sounds/looks like
  • Remembers information better using cues, abbreviations or acronyms
  • Has decreased attention to school and home work and avoids it
  • Has difficulty with multi-step directions and forgets what is told to them
  • Has poor organization skills
  • Difficulties keeping track of time
  • Difficulties making plans
  • Sticks with a plan, even when it’s clear that the plan isn’t working
  • Finds it hard to figure out how to get started on a task
  • Doesn’t always have the words to explain something in detail
  • Can focus on small details or the overall picture, but not both at the same time
  • Difficulties looking for help or for more information when needed
  • Difficulty applying previously learned information to solve problems
  • Loses a train of thought when interrupted
  • Needs to be told the directions many times
  • Has trouble making decisions
  • Difficulties multitasking
  • Does things either quickly and messily or slowly and incompletely
  • Needs help processing what something feels/sounds/looks like
  • Remembers information better using cues, abbreviations or acronyms

What Does Executive Functioning Mean?

Executive functions are the decision-making processes that include planning, organizing, sequencing, strategizing, and response inhibition, sustained attention, time management, flexibility and remembering details. Executive functions are required at the onset of a task or when a novel task is presented. They are needed to organize one’s thoughts and actions in order to create a plan and execute the plan. In addition, executive functions help with self-regulation, which is the ability to monitor one’s behaviors. Improving self-regulatory processes will increase executive control, which together, are central to cognitive, linguistic, behavioral, and affective control—all of which are fundamental to learning and success in school.

Treatment for Exectuvie Functioning?

AMPS (Attention, Memory, & Processing) is a cognitive processing skills program that uses whole-brain learning exercises designed to improve mental processing speed, working memory, attention, sequential processing, spatial orientation, visual and auditory memory, phonological awareness, motor planning, reasoning, and problem solving. AMPS works on the underlying foundational skills needed for learning and is especially beneficial for students diagnosed with ADD/ADHD, Gifted (2-E), Autism Spectrum, PDD, Auditory Processing Disorder, Non-Verbal learning disorder, etc. AMPS develops new, more efficient neuro-pathways in the brain, thus frequency and repetition is critical to success.

With AMPS you can expect to see improvements in the following areas:

  • Visual and Auditory Memory
  • Organizational Skills
  • Reading and Comprehension
  • Visual and Auditory Processing
  • Processingg Speed
  • Logic and Reasoning Skills
  • Neatness of Writing/ Completion of Written Work

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What Does Executive Functioning Mean?

Executive functions are the decision-making processes that include planning, organizing, sequencing, strategizing, and response inhibition, sustained attention, time management, flexibility and remembering details. Executive functions are required at the onset of a task or when a novel task is presented. They are needed to organize one’s thoughts and actions in order to create a plan and execute the plan. In addition, executive functions help with self-regulation, which is the ability to monitor one’s behaviors. Improving self-regulatory processes will increase executive control, which together, are central to cognitive, linguistic, behavioral, and affective control—all of which are fundamental to learning and success in school.

Treatment for Exectuvie Functioning?

AMPS (Attention, Memory, & Processing) is a cognitive processing skills program that uses whole-brain learning exercises designed to improve mental processing speed, working memory, attention, sequential processing, spatial orientation, visual and auditory memory, phonological awareness, motor planning, reasoning, and problem solving. AMPS works on the underlying foundational skills needed for learning and is especially beneficial for students diagnosed with ADD/ADHD, Gifted (2-E), Autism Spectrum, PDD, Auditory Processing Disorder, Non-Verbal learning disorder, etc. AMPS develops new, more efficient neuro-pathways in the brain, thus frequency and repetition is critical to success.

With AMPS you can expect to see improvements in the following areas:

  • Visual and Auditory Memory
  • Organizational Skills
  • Reading and Comprehension
  • Visual and Auditory Processing
  • Processingg Speed
  • Logic and Reasoning Skills
  • Neatness of Writing/ Completion of Written Work

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Challenges Relating to Oral Motor Skills/Sensory Processing:

  • Is a picky eater
  • Dislikes certain textures
  • Drools
  • Has poor speech articulation
  • Has difficulty learning to latch on / breast feed or transition to solid foods
  • Is a messy eater
  • Chews with mouth open
  • Overstuffs mouth
  • Avoids eating meat (tough textures)
  • Dislikes brushing teeth
  • Is a picky eater
  • Dislikes certain textures
  • Drools
  • Has poor speech articulation
  • Has difficulty learning to latch on / breast feed or transition to solid foods
  • Is a messy eater
  • Chews with mouth open
  • Overstuffs mouth
  • Avoids eating meat (tough textures)
  • Dislikes brushing teeth

What Is Oral Motor Mean?

Oral-motor skills refer to the movement of the muscles of the face. This includes muscle tone, muscle strength, range of motion, speed, coordination, and dissociation. Clinical experience suggests that the acquisition and maturation of oral-motor movements underlies sound production and feeding skills (e.g., sucking, biting, and chewing). Feeding issues in children are often secondary to early medical issues, unidentified muscle weakness or motor planning, or underlying sensory processing deficits. The longer children's feeding deficits persist without intervention, the more likely that behaviors and habits will set in, causing further complications.

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How We Treat Your Child

At OT 4 Kids we use a variety of developmental and muscle-based oral motor, feeding, and swallowing techniques. This allows the child the opportunities to build strength and coordination of their oral motor structures, while interacting with food in a playful manner. This approach not only increases their comfort and willingness to explore and manage more foods, but also increases their sensory tolerance. Some of our techniques derive from the following: Beckman Oral Motor Program, The S.O.S. Approach to Feeding Model, Baby Led Weaning Techniques, The Get Permission Approach, and Swallowing Assessment and Intervention.

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What Is Oral Motor Mean?

Oral-motor skills refer to the movement of the muscles of the face. This includes muscle tone, muscle strength, range of motion, speed, coordination, and dissociation. Clinical experience suggests that the acquisition and maturation of oral-motor movements underlies sound production and feeding skills (e.g., sucking, biting, and chewing). Feeding issues in children are often secondary to early medical issues, unidentified muscle weakness or motor planning, or underlying sensory processing deficits. The longer children's feeding deficits persist without intervention, the more likely that behaviors and habits will set in, causing further complications.

How We Treat Your Child

At OT 4 Kids we use a variety of developmental and muscle-based oral motor, feeding, and swallowing techniques. This allows the child the opportunities to build strength and coordination of their oral motor structures, while interacting with food in a playful manner. This approach not only increases their comfort and willingness to explore and manage more foods, but also increases their sensory tolerance. Some of our techniques derive from the following: Beckman Oral Motor Program, The S.O.S. Approach to Feeding Model, Baby Led Weaning Techniques, The Get Permission Approach, and Swallowing Assessment and Intervention.

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